CLMI – Dr. Timothy Truster

Computational Laboratory for the Mechanics of Interfaces



10/25/2015: Graduate assistantship for crystal plasticity modeling – FILLED

We have an open PhD position starting in either the Spring or Fall semester 2016 at the Computational Laboratory for the Mechanics of Interfaces. The research topic centers upon the modeling of texture evolution in FCC and BCC metals using dislocation density based crystal plasticity. Particular emphasis is placed upon cyclic mechanical loading as well as the thermomechanical coupling between heat generation due to plastic deformations and degradation of material properties due to rising temperature.

Candidates should possess a master’s degree in civil, mechanical, or other related engineering field at the time of enrollment at UTK. A strong background in computational mechanics, materials science of metals, and/or computer programming in MATLAB and FORTRAN is desired. US citizenship or residency is also desired, though not required.

If interested, contact Dr. Truster directly at ttruster@utk.edu. Please include your CV along with a brief description of prior research experiences and how your interests align with the research conducted at CLMI. In your CV, include: GPA, GRE test scores, and publication list.


09/10/2015: Minisymposia at EMI 2016 Conference: Computational Mechanics and Interface Modeling

We are co-hosting two mini-symposia at the EMI 2016 Conference at Vanderbilt University http://www.vanderbilt.edu/emipmc2016/.

Abstracts are sought that are relevant to the following topics:

“Computational Methods and Applications for Solid and Structural Mechanics”

The aim of this minisymposium is to provide a forum for discussing the novel computational methods and applications that pertain to solid and structural mechanics problems. This minisymposium seeks to bring together students, academicians and professionals working on computational solid and structural mechanics. In particular, contributions on the following topics are of significant interest: (a) novel discretization techniques and computational methods for contact, fracture, interface modeling and other important engineering problems; (b) multiscale modeling and methods for heterogeneous materials including composites, concrete, wood, and others; (c) multiscale modeling and methods for structural mechanics problems; (d) computational methods for time dependent structural and material response (collapse, creep, fatigue, etc.); (e) modeling of multiphysics phenomena (e.g., coupling of mechanics with electromagnetic, chemical, or transport effects); (f) solution techniques, error estimation, algorithmic analysis and convergence studies in computational mechanics. This MS is sponsored by the EMI Computational Mechanics Committee.

“Modeling the Mechanics of Material Surfaces and Interfaces”

The intent of this symposium is to bring together researchers investigating the mechanics and physics of interfaces, including free boundaries or surfaces. Interfaces are a critical physical feature of many natural and engineered systems. The computational modeling of such systems is complicated by evolving discontinuities, capturing local spatial and temporal scales that can be orders of magnitude below the system scales, as well as the formation and/or interaction of free surfaces. Problem classes include, but not limited to, contact and friction between deformable bodies, delamination or fracture in materials, localization or boundary layer tracking, fluid-structure interaction, and growth instabilities in biological/material systems. Computational techniques that address stability issues in interface methods and imposition of interface conditions, such as, mortar finite element methods, discontinuous Galerkin methods, extended/generalized finite element methods (XFEM/GFEM), Nitsche methods, mixed interpolation methods, and embedded mesh methods are welcome. Submissions that relate to either the development of such methods or their application to engineering problems are encouraged.

Further information can be found on the conference website http://www.vanderbilt.edu/emipmc2016/EMI.mini-symposia.php. Deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2015.


07/24/15: Nonlinear Mechanics and Dynamics Summer Research Institute

The 2nd Nonlinear Mechanics and Dynamics Summer Research Institute was held from June 23 to July 31, 2015, at Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. The institute hosted 25 graduate students and 14 staff and faculty mentors from 11 countries and 17 universities. Students participated in 7 research projects focused on various aspects of interfacial mechanics, jointed structures, and other nonlinear mechanics and dynamics problems. The preliminary results from the institute will be presented at the 2015 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference in Boston on August 5, 2015.

Dr. Timothy Truster served both as a member of the organizing committee and as a faculty mentor for two student research groups. The first research project was a round robin comparison of numerical techniques for structural dynamics with nonlinearities. The students employed harmonic balance and transient simulation methods to predict the behavior of a beam containing a bolted joint. The second research project investigated the propagation of stress waves through jointed connections. The students compared quasi-static and transient numerical models for flexural and torsional loads applied to the same jointed beam. The numerical studies by these groups were complemented by experiments performed by other student teams on actual specimens of the jointed beam. Dr. Truster participated remotely in weekly project meetings to help direct the students. He also traveled to the institute during the weeks of July 13 – 24, 2015 to interact with the students and other international collaborators.

The third annual institute is currently being planned for summer 2016 to continue the studies on the dynamics of bolted structures and other nonlinear mechanics problems.


01/05/2015: Mini-symposium at USNCCM13: Stabilized and Multiscale Methods for Interface Mechanics

We are co-hosting the mini-symposium “Stabilized and Multiscale Methods for Interface Mechanics” at the 13th US National Congress on Computational Mechanics in San Diego http://13.usnccm.org/.

Abstracts are sought that are relevant to the following topics:

Interfaces are a critical physical feature of many natural and engineered systems. The computational modeling of such systems is complicated by evolving discontinuities, capturing local spatial and temporal scales that can be orders of magnitude below the system scales, as well as the treatment of possible multi-physics aspects. Specific examples include the interactions between stiff/inert implant devices and soft/living biological tissues, both process and failure modeling of fiber-reinforced composites, and capturing shock-wave transfers across fluid-solid interfaces in underwater structures. Stabilized methods provide a coherent approach to addressing such sources of instability.

The intent of this symposium is to bring together researchers considering various aspects of interface problems. Topics involving stabilized as well as multiscale methods for interfacial modeling are encouraged. Techniques that address stability issues in interface methods such as mortar methods, discontinuous Galerkin methods, Nitsche methods, and embedded mesh methods are welcome. Problem classes can range from contact and friction to delamination, heterogeneous materials, and localization or boundary layer tracking. Special emphasis is given to methods that are robust with respect to mesh distortion, accommodate different element types or polynomial orders, and are applicable to a broad range of material constitutive response.

Further information can be found on the conference website. Deadline for abstract submission is February 15, 2015.


09/29/2014: Mini-symposium at EMI 2015 Conference: Computational Methods and Applications for Solid and Structural Mechanics

We are co-hosting the mini-symposium “Computational Methods and Applications for Solid and Structural Mechanics” at the EMI 2015 Conference at Stanford University www.emi2015.info.

Abstracts are sought that are relevant to the following topics:

The aim of this MS is to provide a forum for discussing the novel computational methods and applications that pertain to solid and structural mechanics problems. This MS seeks to bring together students, academicians, and professionals working on computational solid and structural mechanics. In particular, contributions on the following topics are of significant interest: (a) novel discretization techniques for modeling cracks and discontinuities (e.g., XFEM/GFEM, meshless methods, discrete elements, cohesive elements, peridynamics and others), (b) reliable computational damage mechanics formulations (e.g., nonlocal methods, gradient methods, other regularization techniques); (c) multiscale modeling and methods for heterogeneous materials including composites, concrete, wood, and others; (d) computational methods for modeling inelastic material behavior (creep, fatigue, plasticity, etc.); (e) multiscale modeling and methods for structural mechanics problems; (f) modeling of multiphysics phenomena (e.g., environment induced material degradation, coupling between mechanics and electromagnetic effects, mechanics and transport phenomena, coupling between mechanics and chemistry, and others). This MS is sponsored by the EMI Computational Mechanics Committee.

Further information can be found on the conference website. Deadline for abstract submission is November 15, 2014.


08/26/2014: Two graduate student assistantships are available – FILLED

Two positions are available for prospective MS or PhD students to conduct research on projects related to advanced materials characterization, fracture mechanics, and numerical method development. Highly-motivated students are sought who have strong communication skills and preferably experience is one or more of the following areas: solid mechanics, finite element modeling, and computer programming. If interested, contact Dr. Timothy Truster directly at ttruster@utk.edu. Please include your resume along with a cover page describing any prior research experience and how your interests align with the research conducted by CLMI.

Contribute to a big idea. Give to UT.

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Big Orange. Big Ideas.

Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 | 865-974-1000
The flagship campus of the University of Tennessee System